iLevel® Empowers Others to Live Confidently

Why do motorized wheelchair users love iLevel® so much? For one thing, it helps electric wheelchair users live independently, but it also empowers them to live confidently. Our Q Roll Models and brand ambassadors share how iLevel empowers them to be confident no matter where they are.

Jesse Cuellar

Confidence means something different to everyone. For Jesse, that means being able to do what he loves independently daily. He cites some examples, such as being able to create art, communicate with others at eye level, change the thermostat, and get to where he wants to go with increased visibility. Jesse doesn’t skip a beat in living his life to the fullest. He believes that if you keep creating new experiences, you’ll always have love for life and the passion for the things that you do. Most importantly, he says that being able to do what you love is essentially loving yourself, which is one of the best things you can do.

Merlisha Henderson

Merlisha explains that confidence is gained in many forms through life experiences and how we are viewed by others. Sometimes wheelchair users aren’t taken seriously by able-bodied people for a number of reasons, from their height to the able-bodied individual’s perception of the wheelchair user’s ability to be independent. Not only are there personal barriers and social barriers that come with using a wheelchair, but another major issue is inaccessibility. Countertops, desks, microwaves and cabinets are just some everyday items that are used routinely but present a challenge for wheelchair users. Learn how Merlisha is regaining confidence with her iLevel motorized wheelchair.

Bryson Foster

Empowerment is for wheelchair users of all ages, whether in high school, college or in the working world. For the past five years, Bryson has been announcing Vex Robotics for his high school and continues to do so in college. With iLevel® Power Adjustable Seat Height, Bryson feels confident when announcing, as he can keep a better eye on the action and competition that is taking place.

Not only does it increase his visibility when it comes to being able to see on the field, but it also helps him maintain a presence within the crowd and interact with the parents and teams that participate every week, building relationships with those he meets. Read Bryson’s story.

Emily Ladau

Emily Ladau makes a distinction between having power and being empowered. To Emily, having iLevel is less about being higher up and more about having access to a piece of assistive technology that enables her to make that happen. Empowerment means being able to reach a high shelf in a grocery store or reach the microphone at a podium while giving a presentation. Ultimately, she has the choice to be at whatever height works for her. She now advocates for a world in which a person’s height is not something that influences society’s perception of them, as well as a world in which people have access to the technology they need to be empowered in a way that works best for them.

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